Golden Knight gives the Ultimate Sacrifice

 

 

 

 

It is with great regret that Lieutenant Colonel Jose Melendez and Members of the team bid farewell to a Golden Knight, Staff Sergeant SSG Eric S. Holman.  Holman 39, from Evans City, PA was killed August 15th  by an enemy improvised explosive device (IED) in Gnazni province Afghanistan. 

In 1996 Holman earned a Bachelor of Science in Administration of Justice from Pennsylvania State University. In 1997 he learned to skydive and liked it so much that he worked honing his skills to become an air coach, static line instructor, tandem instructor and FAA senior parachute rigger and enjoyed the occasional base jump.

 SSG Eric S. Holman enlisted in the Army in October of 2003 as an aviation powertrain repairer. Holman was afforded the opportunity to attend the Golden Knight Assessment and Selection Program in September 2005. Upon completion of the rigorous six-week program he was ‘knighted’ and assigned to the Gold Demonstration Team.

 Holman served for over four seasons on the Knights as a demonstration parachutist for the Gold Demonstration Team where he logged more than 2800 free-fall parachute jumps, 1000 tandems and 21 military static line jumps.

In his free time, Holman enjoys spending time with his wife and son; working on and riding motorcycles; shooting and mountain biking.

Eric’s teammates are deeply saddened  by the news of his death and reminisce about all the great times shared with their brother.

SFC Tom Dunning said, “Eric taught me to ride a motorcycle.” Tom gave Eric so many accolades to include giving him the best gift he could have ever given him was the passion for getting out and riding a motorcycle.

Tom had a long chat with Eric about two weeks ago and Eric said, he couldn’t wait to get back to Fort Bragg, so they could go riding.

SFC Noah Watts said,   “If something had wheels and a engine that Eric could drive it and that he was the first person he ever saw drink a hot cup of coffee while riding his bike.” Noah also said,” Eric was a phenomenal teammate, that he would do anything for anyone and that he had even loaned him his enclosed trailer to move from Georgia even though he just met him, and oh yea, Eric looked great bald!”

 

 

Golden Knights on World Record Jump

On Friday 138 Jumpers from around the globe set a World Record for the largest vertical formation in the skies over Skydive Chicago. The previous record of 108 was eclipsed by 30 jumpers. SFC Joe Abeln and SSG Reese Pendleton from the Golden Knights were honored to be part of the jump.

Training for the jump started nearly two years ago. To be invited on the jump, everyone had to attend multiple big way camps and tryout events. The camps happened across the United States and around the globe. Each tryout camp saw between 50-80 jumpers trying out for just a few invites. The Golden Knights received their invites after attending two separate camps in Sebastian FL.

On the first day of the record attempts over 175 skydivers gathered in the auditorium for a safety briefing and slot assignment. Nearly 30 jumpers were there hoping to get a slot on the record breaking jump. Organizer, drop zone owner, and honorary Golden Knight Rook Nelson had two goals for the event. Every one go home safely, and everyone go home safely with a World Record. The goal for the record was a 142 way vertical formation. The organizers only planned for four jumps for the first day to allow for extra time dirt diving and debriefing. Six airplanes, four Twin Otters, a Sky van and a Sherpa took the record team to an altitude on 17500 ft. After the first two jumps were complete the team was very close to setting a new World Record. 130 of 142 jumpers were in the formation on the 2nd jump, just 12 off. The 3rd and 4th jumps of the day saw some communication problems with the trail plane causing jumpers to leave too early or too late to make it to the formation. Still it was a great day and the team was eagerly awaiting day two.

The Second day of the camp started early as the World Record team was ready to get to work. The organizers made a few small changes to the formation to allow for more room in some tight areas. Each jump was closer and closer. The formations were now seeing the 140 mark just a couple off the record. On jump number four of the 2nd day and jump 9 of the event everything seemed to come together and the formation appeared built. Jumpers began to celebrate as they began to break away from the formation. It looked like jump 9 was the record setting jump. As everyone landed there was definitely a positive vibe in the landing area. The videographers took their footage to the FAI Judges for review. After quite a bit of time Nelson came out and told everyone to gear up the team was on a 20 minute call. This meant that the record was not complete. 142 jumpers completed a formation but unfortunately the newly repositioned jumpers had taken a grip with the wrong hand. This formation set a State record and Guiness World Record but not an FAI World Record, which is what the team was shooting for. With sunset quickly fading on the second day the last jump was close but not complete.

The third day of the record attempts was finally underway. The motivation was high despite being so close on the previous day. The second jump of the day once again looked as if we had set a new world record. Everyone appeared to have docked on the formation. Another long review and unfortunately yet again the record eluded the group. The pictures did not show all of the grips clearly and back up the team went. After the 14th attempt, the 4th of the day, the organizers made a decision to go with a 138 way formation. The team loaded up into the fleet of 6 aircraft and took to the skies. Nearly 45 minutes later and this time 18,500 ft above the ground the planes flew over the drop zone and the 138 jumpers quickly exited the aircraft. The formation began to build and with several seconds to spare. It appeared that everyone was on the formation and it was completed. No one was ready to celebrate just yet they wanted it to be official first. The jumpers landed, went inside and repacked their parachutes while the judges reviewed the photos. A long time went by and people began to wander. Nelson came back out and told everyone to get their gear and meet up on the lawn for another dirt dive. As disheartening as this was 138 jumpers headed back out to get ready the next attempt. Everyone picked up their grips on the lawn and built the formation on the ground. Nelson then came through and opened the formation up for a team photo. Everyone knew what that meant. The team set a new World Record 138 way formation. Cheers erupted, high fives and hugs spread across the drop zone.

The record breaking jump was aired around the world on various news outlets and even made ESPN’s top 10 plays of the day. It was a great honor for the Golden Knights to be part of the World Record jump. SFC Abeln and SSG Pendleton spent quite a bit of time preparing for the jumps and the accomplishment was a great pay off. A big thanks to Rook Nelson, Mike Swanson and the team of organizers and videographers, and Skydive Chicago for organizing a very successful and safe world record jump.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-08-04/skydiving-record/56768198/1

 

 

 

Blue Skies JT

 

The Golden Knights proudly and humbly memorialize Jonathan Tagle with the letters JT flown in free fall above Laurinburg NC. Home of the Golden Knights. The initials he was famously known for. He was more than just a skydiver. JT was an inspiration to all of those that put on a parachute. He was a professional canopy pilot, a pioneer and an ambassador for a country in a discipline that has no margin of error. One which is not for the feint of heart. Flying parachutes at speeds nearing 90 miles per hour inches from objects and from the ground. His smile was infectious and his attitude was glorious. In an individual sport he was one of my biggest adversaries. With his small stature, but his larger than life personality which was only matched by his incredible talent. I have been teammates with him several times as we represented the United States in international competition. He pushed me to want to be a better pilot. His mere presence made everyone perform to the best of their abilities, because if they didn’t he was unbeatable. He was, several times over a National Champion and a World Champion. We were competitors together we were competitors against one another, we were team mates but most of all we were friends. With a heavy heart and my deepest condolences to his family, his friends and fellow teammates on the Performance Designs Factory Team, I say good bye to a true friend.

Blue Skies JT

(written with deepest simpathy and warmest regards by Greg Windmiller)

 

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